Montana State University
MSU Extension > Community Resources > Creating Healthy Communities

MSU Extension's Community Health Resources Program

337 Culbertson Hall
P.O. Box 172230
Bozeman, MT 59717

Tel: (406) 994-5552
Fax: (406) 994-1756
Location: Culbertson Hall
dyoung@montana.edu

Community Health Specialist:

David Young

MSU Extension - Community Health Resources

College Department

Creating Healthy Communities

AT&T Don't Text While Driving Documentary
AT&T's Txtng & Drivng Campaign Urges Consumers That It Can Wait. This documentary featuring families affected by texting while behind the wheel is being distributed to educators, government officials, safety organizations and public as part of an educational awareness campaign.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dht-Vy25jPs

What Really Makes Us Healthy? Health beyond Healthcare
The top contributors to long-term health may be surprising to most. As it turns out, only a fraction of what affects our health is actually related to healthcare. To truly improve outcomes, we need to look beyond healthcare at a variety of factors that impact health.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zx6dJ4O4sZQ

Dose Matters: An Approach to Strengthening Community Health Strategies to Achieve Greater Impact
Dose Matters describes the concept of "population dose" - an approach to strengthening and evaluating the impact of complex multisector, multilevel, place-based initiatives. This discussion paper reports on what is promising about the approach while recognizing the measurement and other challenges that still lie ahead. The concept emerged from ongoing evaluations of Kaiser Permanente's Community Health Initiative investments, conducted by the Center for Community Health and Evaluation (CCHE) at the Group Health Research Institute in collaboration with partners at the University of California. Following an overview of the Community Health Initiative, this report describes the concept in more detail and explains how it can be used to estimate the population-level impact of a set of related interventions. The estimated impact or dose of an intervention is the product of reach (the number of people touched by the intervention) and strength (the effect size or impact on each person reached). The dose concept can also be used in planning and implementation to yield greater impact.
http://nam.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Perspective_DoseMatters.pdf

County Health Rankings & Roadmaps
The Rankings, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) program, offer an easy-to-use snapshot of overall health for nearly every county in the U.S. For too long being healthy has been defined as simply not needing to seek medical care. But it is time to look at the bigger picture of health, and how it extends to work, family, and community life. Factors such as education, obesity, smoking, unemployment, air quality, poverty, and teen birth rates all influence health. The County Health Rankings measures these factors and more, making it possible for communities to see the health problems they face and create local solutions to solve them. This is important information. But it is only as meaningful as the action it inspires, or the lives it can improve. The County Health Rankings is a key starting point for change.
http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/

What Makes a Community Healthy or Unhealthy?
This video from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) provides a look at the many factors that contribute to creating a culture of health in every community.
http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/resources/what-makes-community-healthy-or-unhealthy

One Health (OH)
The OH concept recognizes that the health of humans is inextricably linked to the health of animals and the environment. In the last three decades, 75% of new emerging human infectious diseases have come from animals. In 2007, the American Medical Association (AMA) passed an OH resolution promoting a human-veterinary partnership with the American Veterinary Association (AVMA). In 2009, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) created a One Health Office (OHO) to promote the concept of OH and to guide CDC approaches to OH. Interest in OH has been growing in the public and private sectors as well as across the national and international scenes. Active supporters include, but are not limited to, the following: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), USDA; World Health Organization; World Bank; European Union; and United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The OH approach embraces the idea that anything adversely impacting the health of humans, animals and/or the environment can only be solved by intentional cooperation and collaboration across disciplines, agencies, institutions and organizations.
http://www.cdc.gov/onehealth/

NACo Healthy Counties Initiative
NACo's Healthy Counties Initiative aims to enhance public/private partnerships in local health delivery, improve individual and community health, and assist counties to effectively implement federal health reform. The initiative engages county officials and private sector partners across the country.
http://www.naco.org/programs/csd/Pages/HealthyCountiesInitiative.aspx

Creating Healthy Communities CoP eXtension
Welcome to the Creating Healthy Communities CoP. The primary purpose of the Creating Healthy Communities CoP is to provide resource support to professionals and community leaders working to improve community health. To help them make positive impacts on their communities, our efforts are focused on providing resources supportive of the following goals: (a)Improving the Health of Vulnerable Populations; (b)Developing Community Engagement and Leadership Skills; (c) Fostering Informed Health Policy Decisions; and, (d) Advancing Healthy Community Environments. If you would like to get involved with the Creating Healthy Communities CoP click here:
http://blogs.extension.org/creatinghealthycommunities/about/